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smørrebrød - danish open sandwich

my version -- dashi braised medium rare roast beef, horse radish/stone grind mustard aiolis, and micro greens on sperlonga bread; finished with sea salt and toragashi…


"Lined up in café windows, served in specialty restaurants, and packed into their very own custom lunch boxes, sandwiches are everywhere in Denmark. They're piled high with pickled herring, spoonfuls of sharp horseradish cream, and mounds of fresh shrimp. But forget what you think you know about sandwiches; these guys are in a different class entirely. Allow me to introduce you to Denmark's—and my—favorite meal: smørrebrød.
Stories and images of flashy, elaborate smørrebrød (pronounced smuhr-broht) accost visitors to Denmark as soon as they step off the plane. But few tourists are familiar with the sandwich's long history and codified preparation—the traits that truly make it a uniquely Danish staple." -- Serious Eats

my other versions...


"Leave it to the Danes to elevate the open-face sandwich to an art form. In a country where understatement and simplicity reign, it makes sense that the unpretentious sandwich is embraced as a national dish. Some surveys conclude that Danes are among the happiest people on the planet, recognized for their tolerant nature and down-to-earth attitude. So perhaps it's without irony that this same relaxed society would make a lunchbox staple an iconic expression of tasteful design, ranking right up there with Georg Jensen silver and Royal Copenhagen porcelain.
Smorrebrod, which translates as "butter bread," includes countless open-face sandwich combinations, from minimal to lavish. How they are assembled varies with the occasion. However, they share a specific preparation method and order in which they are eaten. They also share ingredients that reflect straightforward Scandinavian sensibilities, using simple, honest, local food attractively presented with little waste. This is as close to ceremony as you will find in the easygoing Danish culture." -- NPR
© Faisal Hoque